A Revolution in Behavioral Assessments

The Extended DISC platform of behavioral solutions has been transformed and is ready to alter how organizations address assessments in the future.

This is truly revolutionary.

It is a blank canvas on which to paint virtually anything your mind can conceive.

Below is a sneak peek of a sample comparative analysis for multiple persons applying for a Client Services position.

CSR Role Fit (Extract)

This Sample Report Extract shows the direct comparison of the results of multiple parties with respect to a battery of situation-specific behavioural competencies.

This will give you a sense of what you will be able to do with the platform. This is the type of situation/target specific report that can be produced in short order. The limits are defined by our joint creativity.

This then opens up huge possibilities for use in recruitment and coaching for performance improvement. You can customize the competencies and factors to be used in the evaluation and present the results for all candidates one below the other in the same report. Alternatively, you can produce individual reports.

There is an increasingly large library of behavioral competencies to choose from when creating your reports.

At the same time, it is our work with the development of high performance teams that evokes the highest level of acclamation from Extended DISC clients across the globe.

The Team Maps provide instant insights into the orientation of the team (and entire organization) to current and future demands. They are also invaluable in guiding decisions with respect to the roles that team members are best suited to play.

For more information contact: trevor.smith@swpacademy.com

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Dealing with Stress

John Gray points out that men deal with stress differently from women. Watch the video below.

Our behavioral preferences also influence how we handle stress.

Dominance-orientation (outgoing/task oriented):

Seek a solution. At least lose myself in action.  If I am fully engaged in meaningful activity that I am making progress and the stressor gets pushed into the background.

Influence/Inducement-orientation (outgoing/people oriented):

Put a positive spin on the situation. I will find blue skies somewhere. In the worst case, I find comfort in the thought that this too will pass. In the meantime, I will find something interesting to attract my attention. Live is too short to spend it moping.

Steadiness-orientation (reserved/people oriented):

This calls for support. Together WE can deal with this issue. Let us discuss this and collectively find solutions. I will remain calm but this matter will engage my attention. I am not comfortable simply ignoring it.

Compliance/Conscientiousness (reserved/task oriented):

Go into review mode. Work to find the cause. Evaluate the potential  impact. List possible strategies for resolving the problem and the pros and cons. Choose the best option. Batten down for the worst.

Here is the John Gray take on how men and women handle stress.

Embarrassment Exposed!

Nobody likes to experience embarrassment. Yet, it seems to be part of the reality for most of us.

Embarrassment impacts some people more than others. Some individuals with self-esteem challenges actually curtail interaction with others so as to avoid experiencing embarrassment.

One common error with respect to embarrassment is the notion that someone can embarrass you. We say to our children, “Don’t embarrass me in public!”

The reality is that embarrassment takes place when what is revealed is not in keeping with the image we try to or want to present.

The child’s unruly behavior causes us to choose to be embarrassed because we would like to portray the image of a parent who is able to properly discipline our children. If that were to be true then the episode would not be occurring or would it?

If we accept the reality that our kid behaves in this socially unacceptable way in private and in public then we are faced with another reality. If further, we accept that we are at our wits end working to correct this behavioral issue, then we are better served by seeking help than by being embarrassed. Being embarrassed reflects a sense of “Oh, no! I have been found out.” It produces a sense of shame.

There is a subtle difference between accepting the need for corrective action and being embarrassed – feeling ashamed.

For example, one parent will use the temper tantrum display to reinforce their commitment to getting help if necessary to correct the behavioral challenge.

The parent who chooses the route of embarrassment, either puts on a sheepish grin and beats a hasty retreat or enters into a stern attempt at discipline that is more designed to save face than to achieve any sustainable behavior modification in the child.

When our reality is not what we want others to know, we feel embarrassed. If we are comfortable with “what is” then we feel no discomfort when it is exposed. This relates to our financial situation being shown to be less stable than we would like others to know. Or, our actions being out of step with the value system that we claim to live by.

For example, the professing Christian who is caught in a blatant lie often chooses to be embarrassed. A more useful response would be to recognize the failing and to pray for guidance in avoiding future occurrences.

The so-called “expert” whose competence is found wanting can choose to be embarrassed or can view the incident as a wake-up call to go and get the requisite training.

The next time you feel embarrassed, spend a moment in reflection to identify what reality has been exposed that is not in sync with the image that you would like to portray. Make a commitment to correct the situation.

Are We Groomed To Be Cautious?

“The hands that rock the cradle rule the world.”

The majority of care givers and early childhood practitioners have a preference for the Reserved/People Oriented or S-Style behaviour.

It means that the persons responsible for the socialization process in the critical early stages bring a conservative and risk-averse philosophy to the task.

Examples of S-Style mantra include:

“One thing at a time and that done well”. This flies in the face in the demand for multi-tasking in the rat race world in which we live.

Another favourite is: “When a job has been begun, never leave it till tis done.” One would need to have the uncanny skill to start the most important job all the time and that it remains the most valuable use of your time throughout the completion process.

S-style behaviour in the D-I-S-C Framework is the counterpoint to adventurous characteristic of the D-style – Steadiness versus Dominance.

Does S-Style socialization dampen entrepreneurial fervor? What are your thoughts?

Understanding D of D-I-S-C

Defiance is one of the characteristics of the D (Dominance) style.

The D-style in the D-I-S-C Framework is heavily result-oriented. This produces a significant level of focus on the end game. A competitive spirit and a drive to win are key features of the D-style in action.

“Stubborn”, “Pushy”, “Aggressive” are some of terms that are used to describe D-style behavior when obstacles threaten goal attainment.

Want to hit it off well with your D-style colleague?

Help them achieve their goals. Contributing to the success of the D-style colleague is the most important thing you can do to win their support and respect.

Rough edges? Look past those. No harm or malice is intended. Just this raw desire to achieve desired objectives.

Moses’ Missing Mindset

Moses's Missing Mindset

Moses demonstrated a lot of qualities that are linked to D-style behavior in the D-I-S-C Framework. These include decisiveness and daring.

Moses also displayed the classical D-I-S-C Framework recognition of an absence of Patience in the D-style mindset.

Moses smashed the tablets of stone to pieces when he realized that the Israelites had created idols.

Most notably, Moses struck the rock to produce water in a bout of frustration at the disgusting behavior of the Israelites. He was instructed to “speak to the rock”. That bit of impatience actually cost him his place in the Promised Land.

We should also recall that he killed the Egyptian who was abusing one of his countrymen.

Moses seemed to have a relatively short fuse. That is in keeping with D-I-S-C Framework analysis of classic D-style behavior.