Stop Wasting Your Time

Where DidTheTimeGo_selfcreated

In conducting Time & Task Management workshops for many years less than 5% of participants believe that they have enough time. Still less believe that they have control over their time.

It gets worse. To date, no one has convincingly won my 168 hour challenge. Take the challenge and see how much time you are wasting.

We have 24 x 7 = 168 hours each week. Using traditional work week figures, it means that each week we have 4 shifts plus one 8-hour day each week. The challenge is to assume that you were reporting to a strict supervisor for each shift/day. In that context, justify your effective use and performance on each of the 4 shifts plus your 8-hour part-time engagement.

A quick disclaimer: This is not about being robots and putting in mega working hours. This is about leading a holistic life that is balanced and fulfilling. Indeed, you might decide not to allocate a single hour to work.

For example, you could decide to invest your time resources in rest and relaxation (R&R). But even then could you satisfy your 5 supervisors about your performance on each shift? Would the hours spent with the TV watching you qualify as effective R&R?

The challenge is to justify your effective use of the 4 shifts plus one work day that you are given every single week.

The consistent realization is that we have hours that we can’t account for. We can’t identify where they went and we are unable to allocate them to any category other than – Miscellaneous (more correctly – Missing.)

Yet, time is our most valuable asset. STOP WASTING YOUR TIME!

Reflect for a moment on a recent well spent hour.  What if you could add 8 of those each week, year after year?

My promise is that if you dedicate 8 structured hours per week to any endeavour you are going to develop very high levels of proficiency at it. You could achieve almost anything.

Recovering 1 hour per day for more effective use can transform your life. Make a commitment now to identify more effective use for 8 hours each week.

You can break it up. You could do 30 minutes in the morning or at lunch time and another 30 minutes at evening time. Others might prefer to block out chunks of 3 hours twice per week plus 2 one-hour sessions on the weekend. (This is the formal study model).

You can also target different areas and objectives.  Devotion early morning, exercise late afternoon, professional development early evening and proper R&R thereafter.

I recommend 8 areas that should be addressed to achieve a balanced and fulfilled life (not in order of importance).

  1. Family
  2. Career
  3. Spiritual
  4. Social interaction
  5. Financial stability
  6. Health
  7. Personal development
  8. Leisure

Complete an exercise from my Time & Task Management workshops that invariably brings participants to a fuller appreciation of what is really important to them.

Imagine that there is consensus among doctors that you have six months to live. Get a sheet of paper. Draw a line down the middle. Shut out all distractions. Spend the next 10 minutes listing on the left “Things I will do” and on the right “Things I will not do”.

It is amazing how different those lists are from your current reality. Things that dominate your thoughts lose their importance and neglected areas come to the fore: “Will”, “God”, “Travel”, “Relationships” are constants. “Work” heads the list on the right. The truth is in reality we might have less than six months left. Take the time to make the best use of today.

STOP WATCHING YOUR TIME GO DOWN THE DRAIN!

TimeGoingDownTheDrain

Send your 168 hour challenge to me and complete a very private “Do/Not Do list.”

BOMDAS followers we are at Addition: Brackets|Of|Multiplication|Division|Addition|Subtraction.

To access this entire series go to http://jamaica-gleaner.com/ Enter in search: Outlook Trevor E S Smith

Register now for the SHRM accredited 3-D Leader Certification course or the next cohort of the ICF accredited “Certified Behavioural Coach Award”. Great use of your time!

E-mail: info[at]swpacademy.com

Trevor E S Smith is a Behaviour Modification Coach with the Success with People Academy, Extended DISC/FinxS.

How To Deal With Cliques

Clique_canvapurchase

 

How To Deal With Cliques: A Mathematical Formula For Great Teamwork III

We are using the BOMDAS formula to strengthen teamwork.

BOMDAS is an acronym for Brackets| Of | Multiplication | Division |Addition | Subtraction

Under Brackets we established that Belonging is essential if the team is to achieve high levels of success – in our homes, in our workplaces, and in any group. We placed responsibility for achieving bonding and cohesiveness on the shoulders of the Team Leader.

While the brackets signify inclusion, they also indicate that some things should be kept separate. Including what should be excluded produces the wrong result!

Leaders must exclude anything that negatively impacts their teams.

Culprit #1: Cliques or Informal sub-groups

Among the greatest challenges to the smooth running of a group is the presence of a clique. The clique is a small set within the group that looks to a source other than the official leader for leadership. Cliques have the tendency to undermine the influence of the team leader — deliberately or as a by-product of their agenda.

What can a team leader do to limit the influence of cliques?

The first thing to note is that a clique should not be ignored as it could present a major challenge if allowed to grow in influence.

Note also that threats, ostracism, imposing muzzling rules and any method that relies on coercion will not produce sustained positive results. At best they drive the clique underground and set the stage for guerrilla warfare.

A clique exists because there is the perception of unmet needs – voices not being heard; unhappy with treatment or an aspiration for a greater share of power etc.

A leader’s effectiveness is enhanced by their capacity to uncover unfulfilled needs and then address them to the satisfaction or acceptance of the affected parties.

Here are some steps in your plan to address the challenge of a clique within your group:

Step 1: Review the issue of shared vision, goals and objectives.

  • Use information gathering techniques – surveys, focus groups, informal discussions – to glean information on the aspirations of team members.
  • Work to identify key areas of alignment of team member objectives with formal team objectives.
  • Carefully isolate factors that are not aligned and have the potential to be disruptive or distracting.

You should recognize that the quality of the information received from this exercise is directly related to the environment that has been created. Where there is low trust and a sense that leadership is not committed to the empowerment of team members, people are likely to suppress their true feelings. No matter who is responsible, as leader you must sell “I am different. This initiative is different”.

Step 2: Camp out on identified shared objectives

Place laser-focus on things held in common.

Effective leaders latch on to 2 – 3 shared objectives. They then package and sell them such that they are seen as the glue that holds the team together. If the objective is to win the Gold Medal in the relay then get the stars to run their assigned leg without fuss.

Leaders in every sphere must meet the challenge of identifying goals and objectives that can serve as the glue that holds the group together. When teams are guided into uniting around shared purpose their capacity for high performance is unlimited.

But it is not all milk and honey.

One particularly difficult clique arises when someone believes that they are better equipped to lead the group or for some reason refuses to embrace the leadership of the official leader. Ostracizing that individual and their supporters does not provide a sustained solution. Finding a mutually acceptable role for the individual in the process is a more viable solution. Reconcile rather than exile!

Leadership requires a transformed mind-set.

Our upcoming SHRM accredited “3-D Leader Certification” addresses dimensions not covered in traditional leadership training.

Trevor E S Smith is a Behaviour Modification Coach with the Success with People Academy which is recognized by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) to offer Professional Development Credits (PDCs) for the SHRM-CPSM or SHRM-SCPSM Certifications.

SHRM

 

Home of the ICF-accredited “Certified Behavioral Coach Award”.

ICF_CCE_WEB

 

 

 

 

Joint venture partner Extended DISC/FinxS Caribbean.

ExtendedDISC_LogoColor_v211108

 

 

 

 

 

 

FinxSLogo

 

 

 

 

 

 

SWP Logo

 

Website: http://swpacademy.com

Is Dominant Leadership Better?

There is a school of thought that anything but strong, dominant leadership limits the chances for success.

Jim Collins – “Good to Great” suggests that sustainable success has been achieved by a more consultative, S-style leadership.

However, case studies like Moses and Aaron and the outcomes of their action tend to prolong the debate about the value of dominance as a leadership strategy.

Moses’ Dominant-style seems to have worked better in getting “followers” to remain true to the game plan than Aaron’s Influencer-style. Aaron allowed the people to talk him into allowing them to create man-made Gods.

On the other hand, Moses showed strength and firm leadership to put down the Dathan, Abiram rebellion.

Does that make the D-style “better”? No, each style works best in given situations and terribly in others.

Dealing with Dominant Behaviour

Another tip in relating to the Dominant behavioral style is to recognize the tendency to speak in animated tones.

This may come across as forcefulness and even aggression. Look past that and deal with the facts.

Body language notwithstanding you can in fact can your point heard and even accepted – if your argument is sufficiently compelling.

Challenged dealing with the Dominant behavioral style?

Play a central role in their goal attainment. You will be seen in a totally different light – positively.